Tag Archives: Google

Classroom Tools That Work: Research Tools

The apps and extensions that help power our Google Apps for Education paperless classroom

This is the third in a five-part series about favorite apps and extensions for Google Chrome and Google Drive.

In the first post in this series, I covered some essential tools for managing the new apps and extensions that you’ll want to add to your Chrome browser. In the second, I shared tools that help writers be better writers.  Fair warning up front, though, it’s the research add-ons, apps and extensions that I really love! I am old enough to remember research pre-Internet. I recall sitting in the stacks with the Reader’s Guide, thumbing through microfiche to find articles, writing out copious notes on index cards and legal pads.  Not anymore! Since research is such an important part of the ELA curriculum, this third post will be dedicated to those game-changers that help students conduct research, capture source information, organize ideas, and cite within a research paper or project.

Classroom Tools That Work: Helping Writers Be Better Writers

The apps and extensions that help power our Google Apps for Education paperless classroom

This is the second in a five-part series about favorite apps and extensions for Google Chrome and Google Drive.

In the first post in this series, I covered some essential tools for managing the new apps and extensions that you’ll want to add to your Chrome browser. In this post, I’ll share the tools that my students and I have found to help writers be better writers.  

Four tools that help writers be better writers

Read&Write for Google

What is it?

Read&Write for Google is a Chrome Extension that is used within a Google document. Teachers can sign up for premium features free; students start with a 30-day trial; some features disappear after the trial, but many remain.

Classroom Tools That Work

 

A look at apps and extensions that help power our Google Apps for Education paperless classroom

This is the first in a five-part series about favorite apps and extensions for Google Chrome and Google Drive.

I have been using Google Drive for four years now to power our paperless classroom.  In previous posts, I talked about how the comment tools in Google have improved student writing and thinking, and about how I have used Doctopus to manage a paperless classroom.  This post features add-ons, extensions, and apps for Google that have enhanced writing, digital creation, research, and feedback in my classes.  

In experimenting with our paperless classroom, my students and I have tried out a great many tools with mixed results.  Initially, I liked every app and extension I saw and filled up my Chrome browser and Google Drive accordingly, but in the process of testing apps and extensions with students, I have better defined my criteria for a useful tool.  By my definition, to be useful for students, an app or extension must enhance their learning, as opposed to simply completing a task for them.  To be useful for me as a teacher, an app or extension must truly enhance my instruction, not simply add bells and whistles.  And for all of us, the app or extension has to work seamlessly.  Here are the apps and extensions we’ve found most useful arranged by purpose.  Incidentally, we only used apps and extensions that were free or that had free versions at the time.  This may have changed since our testing of them.  

Becoming Authentic Writers, Part 3

How the paperless classroom goes beyond teacher convenience

This is the third in a series of posts about the impact of a paperless approach on the writing process and product.

In the first post in this series, I talked about using technology to improve my feedback to high school students, and in the second, I wrote specifically about the growth I see in my students as a result of using the tools in Google Drive.  This post will explain how I organize a paperless classroom using Google. I delayed writing this post when I found out about Google Classroom, a learning management system to be released in the fall for schools using Google Apps for Education. Now that I have had the time to preview Classroom, I’ll explain what I do to stay organized in a paperless classroom using Google, and I’ll touch on how I anticipate Google Classroom complementing my paperless classroom next year.

Becoming Authentic Writers, Part 2

Image by Anasuarezrivero (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
How the paperless classroom goes beyond teacher convenience

This is the second in a series of posts about the impact of a paperless approach on the writing process and product.

In the first post in this series, I talked about using technology to improve my feedback to high school students.  My earliest experiment involved using my smart phone and using an iPad app called Explain Everything to provide audiovisual feedback for students.  My paperless classroom, though, has evolved quickly, and this year, we went Google.